The Experiment of Making Turkish Delight

Turkish Delight

With ladyredspecs in the house visiting for Christmas just gone, it seemed like a great time to do some experimenting in the kitchen and play with some challenging and fun recipes.  Mum’s history with food is varied and many years spent honing her skills in commercial kitchens and educating herself with some of the top chefs in the country at cooking schools meant that challenges like attempting to work with sugar should hopefully be a little easier for me.   Little did we know that this would turn into an adventure for both of us, and one that has been quite enlightening and educational.

First up I will say, humidity messes with a lot more than just your hair!

Turkish delight wasn’t actually on the original list, but discovering that a few of the G family members love it meant we had to give it a go.  Particularly as the sugar thermometer was also visiting Brisbane for Christmas.

I borrowed this recipe from Allessandra Zecchini’s blog choosing it over other recipes because it was less sugar laden and didn’t include colouring or gelatine.

Whilst the method seemed fairly straight forward even in the cooking process we found ways we thought we could improve what we were doing. In particular that we should be able to cook the sugar and cornflour together rather than having them separate. The good news is that this first batch kept its shape, although the time spent in the fridge meant that the sugar coating it melted leaving a not quite so attractive container of goo…eat this recipe fresh if you want it to look pretty, or be prepared to re-dust to serve. Cooler climates could very well keep their wares in a cool cupboard and avoid our little melting episode.

So the results of the first batch were that we found our turkish delight to have a clear taste of cornflour which wasn’t great, although it had a lovely finishing flavour of rosewater and raspberry.  The weird thing was that not every square was the same leaving us to think we didn’t blend the sugar and cornflour mix enough.  I thought the texture was good, although it was a little pasty, again leaving us with room with improvement. We do think that more sugar would reduce this and improve the texture as well.

All in all, not a complete disaster, but one that has many opportunities for experimentation and will be gracing my kitchen again.  We’re even talking the possibilities of a Turkish delight cocktail.

our-growing-edge-badge

This recipe is my contribution to this month’s Our Growing Edge.   If you’re keen to push your boundaries and challenge yourself in the kitchen then join in our monthly link up party.  This month it is hosted by Louise at Crumbs and Corkscrews.

Happy Baking and Happy Eating,

Leah

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14 Comments Add yours

  1. ladyredspecs says:

    I will nail this one day! Xxx

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    1. Leah says:

      he he…. me too, I’m just going to wait until the climate is a bit more user friendly for my next batch 🙂

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  2. I would never have thought of making Turkish Delight from scratch! How marvelous! It looks absolutely amazing. Did you add pistachios? Um, I suddenly have a desire to re-read the Chronicles of Narnia 🙂

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    1. Leah says:

      lol….I think this lot looked better than it tasted but I am definitely gonig to try making it again once the weather cools down here a bit and the humidity drops. No pistachios either, but it sounds like a good idea 🙂

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  3. trixpin says:

    Wow, you’re so creative!
    I saw a recipe for Turkish delight YEARS ago and have always wanted to try it but just never do … I think I might go to the trouble and then no-one in my family would really want to eat it anyway 😦
    The recipe DOES seem to have a lot of cornflour, but perhaps that’s normal? You’ll have to experiment some more, now you’ve got the method mastered 🙂

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    1. Leah says:

      Thank you! I’m going to consider this one a work in progress, but there will be a mark 2 in my future as I loved the flavour when it tasted right and I think its possible to create something truely delightful 🙂

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  4. Your Turkish delight look fabulous. Something love eating but alas have not ventured into making any yet.
    🙂 Mandy xo

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    1. Leah says:

      Thank you! It was definately an experiment in the making, but one that I’m very happy to try again 🙂

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  5. nancy@jamjnr.com says:

    I’m liking the idea of a Turkish Delight cocktail….

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    1. Leah says:

      well we haven’t done it yet, but with a resident mixoligist its only a matter of time 🙂

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  6. bricimino says:

    Look at you and your bad self. That’s awesome. You don’t see Turkish delight that often in the states. My grandparents always had a tin. I may have to attempt this one.

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    1. Leah says:

      Thank you, it really is delicious when it’s made well. I’ve just got to improve my efforts still 🙂

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  7. Stephanie says:

    I have wanted to try making Turkish Delight but I’ve been put off by the cooking time. This recipe is more approachable than other recipes I have seen. Maybe I’ll try it!

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    1. Leah says:

      Make sure you have a sugar thermometre & good luck. I’d live to hear how you go 🙂

      Like

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