We all love a bit of Crumpet

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Crumpet has a two different meanings depending on where you are from.   As a breakfast item, crumpets are something that Australian’s are familiar with for breakfast created by the Golden company.  For me, as a child I loved this sweet yeast cake sometimes served instead of toast for breakfast.  It’s light bubbly appearance and texture meant that you could smear butter and honey or golden syrup onto it and it would soak right through to the crisper base creating a delicious moist and buttery treat.   I was also always a fan of a smear of Vegemite for a salty contrast with the buttery soaked crumpet.

* sourced from tiptop-foodservice.com.au
* sourced from tiptop-foodservice.com.au

As an adult I also know it can be used in English slang, although perhaps not so frequently anymore, to refer to an attractive and sexy woman.  Whilst this would make for a very interesting post on my food blog I’m going to be more focused on the former.

They are still something of a treat for me if I buy them and I’ve never considered making them having not been aware of even how to go about it or what created the bubbles and light and fluffy texture.  Mrs Beeton to the rescue for solving this mystery for me.  The Cookbook Guru was the perfect vehicle to attempt to make these childhood favourites.  She actually titles them pikelets (which I know as something different altogether) but the description sounds like it is the right thing so I thought I would give them a try and see if I can create a childhood favourite at home that compares to my memories of the commercial product.

I was under no illusions about the ease of making this recipe as a sneak peak into Elizabeth David’s English Bread and Yeast Cookery talked about the trials and tribulations she had in attempting to create successful crumpets.  If an authority like her finds these challenging that what was little old me in for?

Well the good news is that my first attempt wasn’t that bad.  The flavour was good, the texture was light and fluffy, but they looked and tasted nothing like the commercial versions that I know.  I think the main thing was that the batter was too thick, which altered the texture, and ultimately the look.  I am going to give the batch a second attempt and see if I can create something a little more related to what I know.  The good news is that I can see how easy it would be to make English Muffins, in particular in the original reading of the book Beeton talks about the recipe being very similar, the difference in the consistancy of the batter only.

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Crumpets – The Original recipe from the 1907 cookbook

Ingredients – To every quart of milk allow 1-1/2 oz. of yeast, a little salt and flour.

Mode – Warm the milk, add to it the yeast and mix these well together; put them into a pan and stir in sufficient flour to make the whole like a batter than a dough.  Let it rise for about 1/2 hour, pour into iron rings, which should be ready on a hot-plate, bake them and whwen one side appears done, turn them over quickly to the other side.

Crumpets – how I made them from the 1963 version

Ingredients:

  • pinch of bicarbonate of soda
  • 1/2 pt. milk/water
  • 1/2 lb plain flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 oz yeast
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • butter for cooking your crumpets

In a large bowl combine the dry ingredients except the bicarbonate of soda.  Place the milk into a small saucepan over a low heat and warm to finger temperature.  Add the milk to the dry ingredients slowly and mix at the same time to avoid the mixture going lumpy.  Cover the bowl with a tea towl and allow to prove for at least an hour, two is preferable.

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At this point mix the bicarbonate of soda with a tbl sp. warm water and dissolve.  Add to the batter and combine well.  Allow to sit for another 45 minutes.

To cook, preheat a fry pan over a med-hot heat.  Melt some butter to be able to continue to grease your pan as you cook your crumpets.  Grease an egg ring and place onto your frypan that has also been greased.  Spoon some of the mixture into the ring until it is filled and allow to cook until the bubbles break on the top of the crumpet.  At this point you should be able to remove the ring and flip the crumpet to lightly brown on top.  Continue until you have used all of your mixture.

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Serve immediately hot with golden syrup or honey.

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Happy Baking and Happy Eating,

Leah

 

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24 Comments Add yours

  1. vannillarock says:

    I am going to give these a go the Thermomix for sure, not least because there is so little sugar in them and, as you say, they are a breakfast favourite. Thanks for posting!

    Like

    1. Leah says:

      My pleasure. Good luck with them. I’d love to hear how you go 🙂

      Like

  2. ladyredspecs says:

    Great post Leah, as you say they look like English muffins, but the texture looks light and chewy as you would expect from a crumpet. I wonder of you hadn’t flipped them if they would have cooked through and had the characteristic pale bubbly top? Maybe even back them, use the rings and preheat the tray? Xx

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    1. Leah says:

      Thanks Mum. You’re right, that might work. I may have been impatient, but it does say in both versions of the recipe to flip them and brown them on both sides like you would a pancake 🙂

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  3. You beat me to it! I love crumpets. You are absolutely correct about the British slang (often said with a leer) “I do like a bit of crumpet” – a tasty morsel, indeed. I’ll have to look into the origin of that pikelet term. I know these as something different, as well. Great post!

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    1. Leah says:

      he he… Thank you Debi. I’d love to see how yours turn out. Mine were good, but I think they can be better 🙂

      Like

      1. Waiting for next month’s book! Although, I may try a similar recipe from Elizabeth David’s English Bread and Yeast Cookery.

        Like

  4. I have not not made crumpets for the longest time and have been thinking about them a lot lately and then I read your lovely post.
    🙂 Mandy xo

    Like

    1. Leah says:

      oh what a lovely coincidence 🙂

      Like

  5. Leah says:

    Reblogged this on The Cookbook Guru and commented:

    A little treat for your Sunday in the form of Mrs Beeton’s Crumpets from Sharing The Food We Love. Enjoy.
    Leah

    Like

  6. Francesca says:

    Lovely Leah, I have never made crumpets but may give them a go one day as I am sure they would be tastier than the supermarket product. For me, its all about butter, lots, ozzing into the holes. and then some more.

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    1. Leah says:

      Thank you Francesca. Definately different from the supermarket version, but yummy. And I totally agree about the butter… lots and lots of butter so it soaks through and seeps out the bottom 🙂

      Like

  7. There seem to be a couple of tricks to getting crumpets like those from a shop. I preheat the ungreased rings at the same time as the pan, and grease them just before I put the mixture in. This takes a little finesse but can be done. You also want a low – medium heat. Cook the crumpets until they are set on top. You will notice the top changes colour. At this point flip them over and lightly brown the other side. If your mixture is the right consistency you will get the characteristic holes this way. I also use a deeper egg ring. Try and buy the deepest one you can because it seems to get better results (and you get bigger crumpets 🙂 )

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    1. Leah says:

      Awesome tips, thank you Tania, I’ll give this a go next time I make crumpets.

      Like

  8. I love crumpets but it’s been far too long since I’ve had one.

    A recipe form 1907. That’s awesome, do you think you might also try that one? I wonder if since the quality of ingredients would have changed, the recipe needs to be tweaked? That might explain your texture issues.

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  9. Glenda says:

    Hi Leah, they sure look good and sound easy enough to make but you didn’t say how they tasted. Are they worth the effort.

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    1. Leah says:

      whoopsie… they were tasty, probably more reminicent of an English Muffin than a commercial crumpet. I think I’ll try them again next month with Elizabeth David’s version but I don’t know that I’d be making them every weekend. They are not something you can cook spontaneously for breakfast 🙂

      Like

  10. ohlidia says:

    Oh, we love a lot of crumpet in this house! Beautiful Leah!

    Like

    1. Leah says:

      Thank you! I’m glad I gave them a shot just to see how they turned out. I’ll definately be trying them again. 🙂

      Like

  11. Hayley says:

    I must try this recipe, I love crumpets and haven’t been able to find them since moving to singapore last year. Thank you for sharing! 🙂

    Like

    1. Leah says:

      Do give them a go. Just be aware… they’re more like an English muffin in flavour and texture than a crumpet that I remember from my childhood although I would suggest making the mixture a bit runnier than I did might help. Good luck, and please let me know how they turn out if you do give them a go. Leah

      Like

    2. Felix says:

      Hi Hayley, At Hyde & Co cafe, 785 North Bridge Road, Singapore 198753 they serve crumpets!
      http://lepakwithyaops.com/hyde-co-english-inspired-cafe-at-north-bridge-road/

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hayley says:

        They look good too! I did find a cafe over on the east coast where they do them as a side (Carrot Rabbit Gun), unfortunately i’m not living in Singapore anymore to try these ones!

        Like

  12. Felix says:

    Thanks for the Carrot Rabbit Gun tip. Can you get Crumpets where you live now?

    Like

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